Skip to main content
RISE logo

Energy efficient supermarkets - Refrigerants

 

 

 

The most common refrigerants (HFC refrigerants in air conditioners, refrigerators and freezers) are some of the most powerful greenhouse gases, and they have a long life span. If we are to succeed in achieving the climate goals, we must reduce the use of HFC refrigerants. The very sharp and rapid increase in all types of refrigeration that can be foreseen in developing countries, will mean a large increase in HFCs.

Within EU, the F-gas regulation applies, which means the decommissioning of refrigerants that contribute greatly to the greenhouse effect, such as the most common HFCs. From 2020, it is forbidden to sell and install the most common refrigerant R404A as its impact on the greenhouse effect is very large (1 kg R404A corresponds to 3900 kg carbon dioxide). In the long run, all HFCs (F-gases) will be phased out. The refrigerants that can replace R404A without the need to rebuild the cooling systems are F-gases with a lower impact on the greenhouse effect. These have lower cooling performance and will in the long run also be covered by the F-gas regulation and banned in the EU. The long-term alternatives are natural refrigerants such as propane (flammable), carbon dioxide (high pressure). Also, Ammonia (toxic) but it is mostly used in industry at cooling capacity’s over a few hundred kW and up.

The supermarkets that have not yet been rebuilt still have the opportunity to install an energy efficient cooling system to achieve low energy consumption in the future. It will be cost effective to seize the opportunity and build a good system from the start.

Energy efficiency potential in professional kitchens - Fast Food Restaurant

+

Evaluation of alternatives to R404A – the most common refrigerant in Swedish grocery stores

+

Flammable Refrigerants – A survey of barriers and how to overcome them

+

Design of Refrigeration Systems for Supermarkets based on Best Available Technology

+

Improved energy behavior in commercial kitchens through digital support with measurement and feedback

+

Alternative to R404A

+

Differentiated temperatures in store freezers

+

Priority actions in existing food premises for increased energy efficiency

+

Plug-in compared to central cooling unit

+

The possibility of raising the freezer storage temperature for frozen goods in stores

+

Doors on the store's refrigerated counter affect the consumer

+

Energy efficient cooling systems in grocery stores

+

Energy efficiency potentials in professional kitchens - Restaurant kitchens

+