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Wearable sensors in smart textile

Wearable sensors can be described as smart electronic devices worn on the body as accessories or as part of the clothing. Built-in sensors in wearables, such as accelerometers, gyroscopes, magnetometers, pulse and moist sensors can be used for continuous monitoring of physiological and movement related variables. The use of wearables in clinical applications has a potential to improve diagnosis and to allow continuous monitoring of disease development and thereby individualize treatment.

Garment with integrated electronics and sensors

RISE provides expertise within sensor development, signal processing, AI and machine learning for applications such as medical diagnostics and healthcare. We have the experience in designing and developing multimodal sensor systems integrated in a garment with advanced signal processing and sensor fusion that utilizes textiles as an active component to overcome problems related to signal artefacts emanating from sensor-patient interface and to provide patient comfort. At RISE, we have the competencies available in the following areas:

  • Designing and developing sensors
  • Solutions for washable electronics
  • Data collection
  • Signal processing
  • Filter design
  • AI, Machine learning and pattern recognition

An example of what we have developed is the integrated sensor garment that measures both the patients motion as well as several physiological parameters, such as pulse, heart rate variability, electro dermal activity and change in blood pressure. It is used for diagnostic purposes and monitoring disease course of patients suffering from epilepsy, Parkinson’s and stroke.

One of the advantages of a fitted garment is that we can be sure that the sensors are correctly situated in the same place every day. It has also become apparent from our focus group that patients don’t see the shirt as some form of stigma; something that can be the case when going about with two or three visible sensor systems. Precise measurements could be obtained in their own home, rather than being confined to hospital for a couple of weeks. The garment is easy to use and is washable in 40 degree C in a standard washing machine.


Contact person

Sara Abbaspour

Research Scientist

+46 10 228 42 26
sara.abbaspour@ri.se

Read more about Sara